"In A Broken Mother Tongue": Tongue Aches: (Re)gaining Fluency

"In A Broken Mother Tongue": Tongue Aches: (Re)gaining Fluency

Tuesday, May 11, 2021 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Location:
Globus Books YouTube Channel

Globus Books is honored to invite you to a series of events "In A Broken Mother Tongue" dedicated to the complexity of the Hebrew-Russian literary process and linguistic reality. This event is Part 1 of the 3-part series. Part 2 and Part 3 will take place on May 18 and 25, at 10 am PST.
This event is in Russian and English and will be held on Zoom on May 11, 2021, at 10.00 am PDT (SF), 1 pm EDT (NY), 20.00 Moscow, 20.00 Jerusalem.
There will be a limited number of seats; please contact Globus Books via FB messenger to register.
We will also be live streaming the event on our YouTube channel (https://www.youtube.com/c/GlobusBooksSF/videos) and later will share the edited version of the program.
In conversation with writers who speak and write polylingually, Liza Michaeli will invite a number of authors to meditate on their experience of language, or, its distant memory.
How does fluency relate to physiological expressions of pathos: repeated or distorted sounds, like a stutter or, moan, signs we traditionally associate with speech failure?
Could a memory and a longing be trapped in this “failing” voice, this tongue which literally aches from failed or occasional fluency?
Could this failure be fruitful?
Drawing from their own literary production, authors will reflect on the possible ways of knowing a language.
What does it mean to command a language, to arrive at an inherited tongue too late, to unbury this tongue?
What does knowing or commanding a language really mean?
As grammatical accuracy asymptotically approaches nothing, what sustains one’s involvement in a tongue?
What is this exilic experience of speaking from the outside in?
“We write in Hebrew because we cannot [live] without it, because the divine spark which is within us emerges only with this flame. Because this sparkle does not burn, does not fulfill in its entirety, but in this language,” wrote Yosef Hayim Brenner in Ha-me’orer (1906).
What did Brenner mean when he wrote that Hebrew fans the flame of our inner divine spark, which “does not fulfill in its entirety, but in this language”? How may we extend this claim to Russian?